Worry Not

Don’t lose sleep. It’s easy enough to say, but how can you intentionally work towards not allowing worry to consume you? Guest Blogger Karen Thalacker has some excellent suggestions to help you reduce stress and rest easy.

Transcript:

Raise your hand if you’ve ever woken up at 3 a.m. worrying about a case?

The truth is we’ve all done it.  Here are 3 suggestions for dealing with the stress we attorneys face every day:

  1. Remind yourself that everything will be ok. You may not know what okay looks like in that moment but very rarely do you do something or fail to do something that can’t be fixed.
  2. Don’t always keep it to yourself. Tell someone else that you’re worried.  A problem can sometimes get much bigger when it stays inside your own head for too long.  Whether it’s your assistant or a colleague, saying it out loud provides the opportunity to hear suggestions and solutions.
  3. Make a list. Sometimes late night panicking is simply the result of feeling a bit overwhelmed.  By writing down what comes to mind, it lessens the anxiety that you’re forgetting something.

Worrying is a part of this job but left unmanaged it can create a host of problems for you in both your professional and personal life.  Acknowledging your worries and facing them head on is integral part of a successful law practice.

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Authored by:

Karen Thalacker

Karen is a graduate of Wartburg College in Waverly, IA, and Drake University Law School in Des Moines, IA. She began her legal career as a prosecutor before entering private practice. For over 20 years, her practice has focused on family law and general practice. Karen is trained in Collaborative Law and also acts as a parenting coordinator for high conflict parents. Since 2009, Karen has served as a judicial magistrate in Iowa. She is also the Chief Compliance Officer and pre-law advisor at Wartburg College. Karen is the author of “The New Lawyer’s Handbook: 101 Things They Don’t Teach You in Law School” and also two knitting books for children. Her commentaries and guest opinions have appeared in the Huffington Post and the Des Moines Register. She and her husband Pete have 4 children.